Visual acuity conversion charts

You often find that one piece of eye-care equipment is calibrated in a different way. All optometrists have a preferred way of recording visual acuity consistently, but your chart may be marked in a different way.

The website linked here has 3 different charts for converting visual acuity measurements (including LogMAR):

1:   Decimal to Metric (1.0 – 6/6)

2:   Decimal to Imperial (1.0 – 20/20)

3:   Metric to Imperial (6/6 – 20/20)

TIP: Print and laminate the chart that is best for your preferred visual acuity measurements in your eye-care practice.  Then put the reference table on the wall near the chart controller.

Click here to go to the page: Then scroll to >Clinical Aids

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Click here to view the Decimal to 6M chart as an example.

When is chromatism noticeable?

Spectacle lens chromatism

Chromatism is the name of the rainbow coloured fringes seen around high contrast borders. These become more noticeable when a person looks away from the centre of lens, especially in high powered lenses.

The website linked here has a worksheet you can use to calculate the distance from the lens centre where patients will notice chromatism in high powered lenses.

TIP: Print and photocopy these forms for making the Clinically Noticeable Chromatism in your eye-care practice.

Click here to go to the page: Then scroll to >Dispensing Aids

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Click here to view the Chromatism worksheet.

Explain ocular coherence tomography (OCT)

Educating patients about their eyecare is always a good idea.

The website linked here has a Patient Education handout about Ocular Coherence Tomography (OCT). It supports the clinical need for OCT and is designed to result in increased uptake of this additional service.

TIP: Print the handout and make colour photocopies with the header banner replaced by your letterhead. Then use these as handouts to support the clinical advice that you give to your patients.

Click here to go to the page: Then scroll to >Patient Education

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Click here to view the OCT download.

How to get teacher feedback about a child’s vision

Looking after the vision of children is a good way to grow an optometry practice. However, children are often unable to give reliable information about their symptoms; so it’s important to understand the signs of a possible vision problem. Optometrists routinely ask parents what they have noticed, but often some of the best observations will come from the child’s teacher.

The website linked below has a handout that can be given to parents for them to pass along to the teacher. We can then gather more information about how a vision problem is affecting the child’s behaviour and school performance.

TIP: Print the handout and make copies for the consulting room. When a situation arises where a prescription would be given only if warranted by the signs & symptoms, give a form to the parents to pass on to the teacher for them to record their observations. The form is then returned at a follow-up assessment when a more informed decision can then be made about treatment.

Click here to go to the page: Then scroll to >Patient Education

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Click here to view the download.

Handouts for explaining eye health

As well as the standard information handouts for Patient Education (about eye conditions like myopia and cataract), two handout sheets have been shared by a practitioner.

The website in this link has downloads that are ideal for use with clinical explanations in the consulting room. There is one about ‘Anatomy of the Human Eye’ in general and another with a ‘Cross-Section of the Human Eye’. Both are a standard A4 size and produced in colour.

TIP: Print each handout and make photocopies for use in the consulting room. Then use these as handouts to support the clinical explanations that you give to your patients – making notes and highlighting relevant areas so that they are personalised to each situation.

Click here to go to the page: Then scroll to >Patient Education

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Click here to view the download for ‘Anatomy of the Human Eye’

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Click here to view the download for ‘Cross-Section of the Human Eye’.

 

How to make your own eyecare handouts

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Giving people reliable information about their eyes and vision is an excellent way to build an optometry practice.

The website linked here has several Patient Education handouts available. These include myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism, presbyopia, glaucoma, cataract & diabetic eye damage.

TIP: You can print each handout and make photocopies with the header banner replaced by your own letterhead. You can then use these to support the clinical advice that you give to patients.

Click here to go to the page:  Then scroll to >Patient Education

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Click here to view the A4 download for myopia, as one example.

How to print a visual acuity chart

It can be very useful to be able to print a Snellen Visual Acuity chart on a standard colour printer. They can be used for home visits for eye tests, school vision screenings, or by GP doctors for use in their rooms.

This website of optometry resources includes downloads for two versions – one on A4 paper for use at 3 metres (10ft – ideal for a local doctor’s consulting room) and a standard 6 metre (20ft) version to be printed on A3 paper.

TIP: Print copies of the 3M version on A4 paper with a colour printer. Then laminate these, or get them laminated at a colour copy centre. Use the finished charts as a handout when you introduce yourself to local doctors (GP’s).

Click here to go to the page:  Then scroll to >Clinical Aids

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Click here to view the A4 download for use at 3M(10ft).