When is chromatism noticeable?

Spectacle lens chromatism

Chromatism is the name of the rainbow coloured fringes seen around high contrast borders. These become more noticeable when a person looks away from the centre of lens, especially in high powered lenses.

The website linked here has a worksheet you can use to calculate the distance from the lens centre where patients will notice chromatism in high powered lenses.

TIP: Print and photocopy these forms for making the Clinically Noticeable Chromatism in your eye-care practice.

Click here to go to the page: Then scroll to >Dispensing Aids

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Click here to view the Chromatism worksheet.

Tips for healthy eyes infographic

The website All About Vision has some great resources for patient education.

Our link below is an infographic about ‘8 Tips for Healthy Eyes’. It covers physical activity, diet, eye exams, smoking, eye safety, etc. We find that infographics are a good way to summarise information in a clear and meaningful way.

TIP: Spread the message by embedding this link your eye care website. (See the embed code below the infographic).

Click here to view the 8 Tips infographic

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Click here to visit the All About Vision website.

Explain ocular coherence tomography (OCT)

Educating patients about their eyecare is always a good idea.

The website linked here has a Patient Education handout about Ocular Coherence Tomography (OCT). It supports the clinical need for OCT and is designed to result in increased uptake of this additional service.

TIP: Print the handout and make colour photocopies with the header banner replaced by your letterhead. Then use these as handouts to support the clinical advice that you give to your patients.

Click here to go to the page: Then scroll to >Patient Education

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Click here to view the OCT download.

How to grow an optometry practice

One of the most common complaints from optometry practices in developed countries is that they are not busy enough.

Needing more patients is one thing, but doing something about it seems to be the challenge. The website in the link below has a practical plan for activities to make any practice busier.

TIP: Print the plan and work through each step and project. Delegate some of the tasks so that staff are involved and empowered. Be sure to take measures of the results – remember if you want to improve something, measure it!

Click here to go to the page: Then scroll to >Practice Growth

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Click here to view the download.

How to track staff meeting items for follow up

While staff meetings are a good idea, the real value will not be achieved unless issues are followed up and results are implemented effectively. This form is used for making notes during staff meetings. As topics are discussed the issues that need to be followed up are identified and assigned to different staff members. In this way they are accountable and actions are encouraged.

TIP: Print a small supply of these forms for use at staff meetings. Then review each assigned issue at the commencement of the next staff meeting.

Click here to go to the page: Then scroll to >Forms & Misc

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Click here to view the download.

Avoid conflicts in optometry practices

It seems obvious that arguments with patients are not good for business, yet sometimes they happen. A common example is when something goes wrong and the patient’s expectations simply cannot be met. How this is handled will be the difference between conflict and understanding.

The way to avoid these situations is by using ‘positive communication’. As an example the website linked below has a case study about completed new spectacles that have not arrived as expected. Most patients will be disappointed, but is there a proven way of handling this situation and avoid conflict?

TIP: Print the download and use the discussion paper for individual staff training, or as a group topic at a staff meeting.

Click here to go to the page: Then scroll to >Staff Training

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Click here to view the download.

How to get teacher feedback about a child’s vision

Looking after the vision of children is a good way to grow an optometry practice. However, children are often unable to give reliable information about their symptoms; so it’s important to understand the signs of a possible vision problem. Optometrists routinely ask parents what they have noticed, but often some of the best observations will come from the child’s teacher.

The website linked below has a handout that can be given to parents for them to pass along to the teacher. We can then gather more information about how a vision problem is affecting the child’s behaviour and school performance.

TIP: Print the handout and make copies for the consulting room. When a situation arises where a prescription would be given only if warranted by the signs & symptoms, give a form to the parents to pass on to the teacher for them to record their observations. The form is then returned at a follow-up assessment when a more informed decision can then be made about treatment.

Click here to go to the page: Then scroll to >Patient Education

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Click here to view the download.

Handouts for explaining eye health

As well as the standard information handouts for Patient Education (about eye conditions like myopia and cataract), two handout sheets have been shared by a practitioner.

The website in this link has downloads that are ideal for use with clinical explanations in the consulting room. There is one about ‘Anatomy of the Human Eye’ in general and another with a ‘Cross-Section of the Human Eye’. Both are a standard A4 size and produced in colour.

TIP: Print each handout and make photocopies for use in the consulting room. Then use these as handouts to support the clinical explanations that you give to your patients – making notes and highlighting relevant areas so that they are personalised to each situation.

Click here to go to the page: Then scroll to >Patient Education

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Click here to view the download for ‘Anatomy of the Human Eye’

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Click here to view the download for ‘Cross-Section of the Human Eye’.